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Protecting the environment by providing legal services for forest cases of statewide significance

Protecting the environment by providing legal services for forest cases of statewide significance.

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Media related to Washington's Forests & Fish Report, Forest Practices Habitat Conservation Plan and other efforts to protect and restore salmon habitat in Washington State.
· Timber industry gets exemption from endangered-species law
Seattle P-I, June 6, 2006; For the next half-century, Washington's timber industry will be shielded from Endangered Species Act prosecutions for harming salmon and four dozen other types of water creatures, the federal government declared Monday.
· Timber-salmon plan gets federal go-ahead
Seattle Times, June 6, 2006; In one of the most sweeping deals of its kind in the nation, federal officials Monday agreed to shield timber companies and forest landowners from provisions of the Endangered Species Act for 50 years if they follow new state rules to protect salmon when logging.
· Critics of 50-year exemption to salmon rules say pact 'predecided'
Seattle P-I, May 9, 2006; For years, timber companies and the government have debated environmental groups and Indian tribes over whether Washington's timber industry should get 50 years of protection from Endangered Species Act prosecutions for harming salmon.
· Timber industry hire eyed as ethics issue
Seattle PI, January 7, 2006; Normally, if someone kills or harms an endangered species, that person is in big legal trouble. But Washington's timber industry won't face such prosecution under a controversial 50-year deal worked out with the federal government by the state Department of Natural Resources.
· Avoid date in court by strengthening habitat plan
Seattle P-I, June 16, 2005; Washington's proposed Habitat Conservation Plan, if approved by the Bush administration, would bless state forest practices rules as adequate to protect not just salmon habitat but also habitat for 55 native fish and amphibians dependent on healthy stream systems.
· Environmentalists, tribes oppose state's forest-management plan
Seattle P-I, May 26, 2005; Today, seven years after their self-imposed deadline, state officials finally have gotten around to filling in crucial blanks left in the forest-management strategy.
· Last call on timber plan for saving salmon
Seattle P-I, Thursday, May 12, 2005; Environmentalists and some Indian tribes today are expected to blast plans to give Washington's timber industry 50 years of protection from prosecution under Endangered Species Act rules protecting imperiled salmon runs.
· In the Washington woods, managers face a catch-22
High Country News, May 16, 2005; In Washington state, the federal government is close to approving a grand compromise aimed at safeguarding both imperiled fish and timber companies. The proposal has reopened a debate, however, over how to balance the needs of wildlife with the wants of industry.
· "License to Kill" A Seattle P-I Special Report
Seattle P-I, May 3-5, 2005; An extrodinary three part series that lays out in impressive detail the controversies over habitat conservation plans.
· Laudable logging, but defer to science
The Seattle Times, February 16, 2005; A contradiction is at the heart of a laudable effort to promote voluntary management of Washington timberlands for the best interests of fish, forests and critters.
· Timber's best practice
Seattle P-I, February 15, 2005; Cooperation, flexibility and prevention of damage are keys to wildlife protection. A state plan to help salmon and loggers relies heavily on those important principles.
· State asks U.S. to OK plan protecting timber industry against legal action
Seattle P-I, February 10, 2005; Citing a controversial plan to tighten logging rules to help salmon, state officials asked the federal government yesterday to give Washington's timber industry 50 years of protection against Endangered Species Act prosecutions and lawsuits.
· Enforce the Endangered Species Act
Seattle P-I, May 19, 2005; The Post-Intelligencer's recent series on how exemptions to the Endangered Species Act are driving many species to extinction illuminates the empty shell of promises by the federal government to protect these resources.
· Last call on timber plan for saving salmon
Seattle P-I, May 12, 2005; Environmentalists and some Indian tribes today are expected to blast plans to give Washington's timber industry 50 years of protection from prosecution under Endangered Species Act rules protecting imperiled salmon runs.
· DNR worker's job move spurs call for ethics look
A Seattle-based environmental group requested Tuesday that the state ethics commission investigate a Department of Natural Resources official who took a job as a timber-industry lobbyist after overseeing a controversial timber-regulation plan.
· Long-sought forest rules OK'd
- Regulations affect private and public landowners throughout state
· Feds put finishing touch on 50-year timber harvest plan
Federal wildlife officials gave their blessing Monday to a 50-year forestry plan aimed at saving Washington state's salmon runs while shielding timber companies from costly Endangered Species Act lawsuits.
· HCP: now, the hard part (Editorial)
Official federal acknowledgment of Washington's homegrown plan to manage its streams and forests for the next 50 years is a laudable achievement. But there is a catch.
· Only 60% of logging operations meet state rules, report says: DNR takes look at deal with industry
Seattle P-I, February 14, 2007; A controversial 50-year deal between the state and logging companies was pitched as a way to save endangered salmon. But a new government report says spot checks found that only 60 percent of the logging operations complied with the rules.
· "Washington's HCP: Adaptive Management or Gridlock?" written by WFLC's director, Peter Goldman
The article outlines environmental concerns with the Forests and Fish Adaptive Management Process and how HCP adaptive management processes can be improved. The article was published in The Osprey, a publication of the Steelhead Committee of the Federation of Fly Fishers.
· High Country News: "Treehuggers and treecutters unite"
The threat of forests disappearing under exurbia has brought some traditional adversaries - environmentalists and the small foresters - to the same table. Together, they’ve succeeded in convincing the state Legislature to tinker with the regulations in a way that could help keep the foresters on the land.
· Seattle PI: "Much-heralded timber deal faces its first challenge"
January 7, 2002 -- Today, the first challenge to a permit issued under Washington's much-heralded Forests and Fish law is being heard before the Washington Forest Practices Appeals Board.
· Seattle PI: "Greenwater timber case hears opposing views"
January 8, 2002 -- The case pits DNR and Weyerhaeuser against the Washington Environmental Council and Washington Trout, which claim the state and the timber company failed to protect a sufficient amount of trees in a planned timber cut along the Greenwater River.
· Seattle PI: "Riverside timber cut hits a snag"
April 16, 2002 -- The Weyerhaeuser Co. and state foresters must reconsider whether they protected enough trees when approving a streamside timber cut on the King-Pierce county line, the state Forest Practices Appeals Board ruled in a potentially pivotal case.
· Seattle PI: "State agrees to review timber practices"
April 20, 2002 -- Indian tribes and environmentalists persuaded the state Forest Practices Board yesterday to order a review of how state officials are enforcing a key part of Washington's timber-cutting rules.
· Press Release: "Settlement averts challenge to Forest Practices HCP"
June 12, 2012 -- State reaches agreement with environmental organizations and timber industry concerning the Forest Practices Habitat Conservation Plan.